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  1. #1

    Poisonous Plants in Colorado

    Ive been doing some hiking lately and I always before I come out next time im gonna do some research on poisonous plants in Colorado, that way if I find my self in a bad situation I know what to do.

    So i figured to post up and get the CO4x4 people to help out. I guess this is much more fun then just reading from Wikipedia. Post up a poisonous plant and the best way to treat it (keep in mind you would be either hiking or wheeling), pics are a good idea, that way we know what you're talking about.

    Here is mine......

    Poisonous Plant: Stinging Nettles



    Remedy

    The most effective neutralizer for the acidic sting of the stinging nettle is a paste made from baking soda and water. Applied to the area of the rash immediately after contact, this works very quickly to ease the pain and soothe the itching. If you are hiking or working outside in an area known to contain stinging nettle plants, it is a good idea to carry a small container of baking soda and a bottle of water. This way, you can mix up a paste as soon as you are stung. Alternatively, you can carry insect sting-relief pads, wipes or liquid. These are also effective in relieving the pain and itching associated with the sting of stinging nettle.

    Also the juice of the stem of jewelweed can be rubbed on the affected area.

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  2. #2
    ni0h's Avatar
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    When you said "poisonous plants", I was thinking of stuff like jimson weed, not mildly irritating stuff that needs soil that's a lot moister than any I see around here.
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  3. #3
    Captain Radon Steve's Avatar
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    I don't believe I've ever seen stinging nettles here. They're everywhere in Ireland and parts of the UK though, trust me.

  4. #4
    I just saw some reports from the 14ers.com website of Stinging Needles up by the 4wd Matterhorn Creek TH. From the report the guy gave he was in pain for 12hrs. I guess everyone is different. Plus you guys have hardly no vegetation down by GJ hahahaha

  5. #5
    Your What Hurts? Sound_Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    I don't believe I've ever seen stinging nettles here. They're everywhere in Ireland and parts of the UK though, trust me.
    Got em in the ditches on the side of the road out at my place this year.
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    It wouldnt surprise me to see stinging nettles at all this year. They require lots of moisture to live. They are very common on the east coast. And I have to agree with the other post above, if the guy hurt for 12 hours he is a pansy. I use to pluck them out of the ground by hand as a kid. They are a minor irritation and thats it.
    If you think education is difficult, try being stupid!!

  7. #7
    So anyone else care to provide more info on other plants?

  8. #8
    I tried some of the pine needle tea, from man vs wild .

    I just remember that if your lost or stranded in the wild to pay attention to what the wild life is eating if the bears n dear can eat it its pretty safe for you.




    as far as poisonous plants do not wipe with any thing green Murphy's law states that it will be poison oak or the like.
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  9. #9
    How about berry's do you guys know of any poisonous berry's in CO? I found some the other day and was wondering if they were eatable. No sorry I didnt take a pic of them.

  10. #10
    Captain Radon Steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoriloco View Post
    How about berry's do you guys know of any poisonous berry's in CO?
    Don't know, but wild raspberries in the mountains are awesomely good.

  11. #11
    LONEWOLF's Avatar
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    I have been in Bull Nettle numerous times in the south and it is no fun, Here Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Rhubarb leaves if eaten I am sure there are more.
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    BradC's Avatar
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    You mean that stuff is stinging nettles? I always thought it was mint and made tea with it! I was never very minty...
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    LONEWOLF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradC View Post
    You mean that stuff is stinging nettles? I always thought it was mint and made tea with it! I was never very minty...

  14. #14
    Growing up in the UK I got stung by those things all the time and it's nothing like 12 hours of pain. No worse than a mosquito bite after the initial sting and more itchy than anything.

    Some English people do make tea out of them but I think that stemmed from WW2 (out of necessity due to rationing). English people will do almost anything for a cuppa

    I've seen them in Colo before, but not that often.

  15. #15
    ni0h's Avatar
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    Don't laugh. Nettle tea is a normal thing. The chemicals that burn don't do well in hot water. It's a nice fresh "green" taste. They also make good greens eaten like chard.
    Live nettles gave me a lot of pain when I was little. They're still a bit of a shock when they catch me unawares.

    The only powerfully-poison plant I ever had to deal with was jimson. A droplet of sap in the eye will dilate you like the optometrist - at least, that's what I got from my only internal exposure. Some people in search of altered states of consciousness will eat seeds or make tea from the leaves. It's a little bit like trying to use ergot fungus as LSD - maybe a few hours of blindness and whirling colors and a feeling of euphoria, maybe nothing, maybe your heart forgets the beat. There's not much range between nothing and death, and it's highly variable in potency.

    Poison ivy has... a look. 3-leaf clusters are an easy thing to see, but many benign plants have that arrangement and similar leaf shape, and many poison ivy plants lack that arrangement. My dad can't see it, but to me, it looks like they're normal green but just about to have their skin split and show purplish-red inner tissue to the leaf. They're green all the way through, but that's the closest I can come to describing what I see. As a result, I haven't been caught by the stuff in 40 years, except dead vines on the way into a tree stand. As I understand it, poison oak and poison sumac have the same urushiol, so while I can't identify them, the treatment's the same. Urushiol is preferentially oil-soluble. Immediately greasing the skin that touched one of those plants and then scraping it off with a sharp edge can cut the severity of an exposure by a lot. Soap and water, ideally as a followup to the grease/scrape, does a lot too. Once the urushiol has a chance to bond with your skin, there's little to help but waiting. Keep the rashy area clean. Try to keep it uncovered. Clothes over it will drag dead skin cells around and spread the rash in a milder secondary rash around the primary.
    Topical antihistamines can give some direct relief. Oral benadryl helps some too, especially for those people who are particularly sensitive and feel like crap all over from the weed.
    Whitetail deer eat poison ivy, a lot.

    Don't eat buckeyes. Part of the nut is safe to eat. Most of it is quite poisonous. There's nothing visual to distinguish the safe from the deadly, but there must be a scent or a taste on the surface, as squirrels are able to tell the difference, and you'll find hundreds of buckeyes with one half eaten. The poison supposedly can be leached out with hot water.

  16. #16
    BumperMan's Avatar
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    Stay away from Red berries. I am too lazy to type how to tell if a plant is edible or not, but I will see if I can find a cut and paste.

  17. #17
    Stinging Nettles are everywhere up here in the Elk Mountains, especially in the Aspen Groves. The trail to the beaver ponds off of Ohio pass is loaded with that devil plant. Main reason I hike in pants even during the summer.
    It was me!

  18. #18
    70jimmy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info on the stinging nettles. Didn't know what it was called just knew I didn't like it. I hate that stuff. Especially in shorts.
    I suffered trail rejection from a carb infection and after futher inspection fuel injection was my election for proper correction and now I want some gear selection, any question?

  19. #19
    School Zones Optional osirus82's Avatar
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    i cant remember any poisonous plants besides 3 leaf ivy, and 5 leaf oak. but i can tell you to say away from most mushrooms unless your very sure of what it is, also you can do a spore test:

    A spore test is done with half black and half white paper. Put the cap down inbetween the 2. After a while it will deposit it's spores. You can tell what color the spores are
    as the will show up on the black part or the white. But this initself tells you noting, depending on what type of mushroom you are testing, You have to look at other features on a mushroom, to get an idea of what it is, then look up what look alikes it has. Often the spore print of one you want to eat will differ from ones you dont in a certain catogory, wich can aid in Id'ing it. But doing a spore print just on any random mushroom, with out other info. Is know way to id it. Get a good mushroom book or 2 and do some reaserch on the net to aid you in mushroom ID. A spore print is very helpfull for mushroom ID but by no means is it the only, and should not be the only meathod used in mushroom ID.

    there are different colors after the spore test for different types of mushrooms. suggest doing lots of research before eating any mushroom

    another benficial plant is the mullen plant also referred to as indian TP its that nice soft velvety plant all over the place and has 2 different growing stages the short leafy stage at the ground level then a tall stalk level to reproduce that has the seed pods, i have read that the seed have a slighly narcotic effect and when put in a calm pools of water it will disorenitate the fish making fish easier to catch.
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  20. #20
    Thanks for the info Osirus.... Can I put the pods in a human pull to catch girls easier??

  21. #21
    I saw stinging nettles by a creek while dirt bike riding up by Divide. They're here, although probably not super common. We used to get into them a lot when I was growing up in Washington. They aren't fun, but they won't kill you either.
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    newracer's Avatar
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    Have you ever seen a man eat so much fish?

  23. #23
    School Zones Optional osirus82's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoriloco View Post
    Thanks for the info Osirus.... Can I put the pods in a human pull to catch girls easier??
    i have heard the indians smoke the mullen leaves, i guess they are slighly narcotic too.

    but i doubt its as potent a ruffie.

  24. #24
    Dont eat these..


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    ni0h's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmo42 View Post
    Dont eat these..

    Tell them a hookah-smoking caterpillar has given you the call.

  26. #26
    Those are pretty. Kinda look like the one's in Mario Bro's, Are you sure they wont make me grow?

  27. #27
    I've run into nettles on the engineer pass road (around Capitol City, IIRC), as well as on the Cebolla Creek Road outside of Lake City. I hate them...
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  28. #28
    tom.keyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmo42 View Post
    Dont eat these..


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

    Death Cap: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_cap

    The yellowish ones in Colorado are the death cap. The red ones are ok. You just have to make sure they dont have the ring around the stem. Amanita Mascara is what they are called and there is a ton of writing on this mushroom through out history.

    In my teen years we used to backpack into the deep San Juan mountains and add them to freeze dried meals.. That and wild asprin and other good herbs to make camping a bit more enjoyable...

    THis is a good thread if you have never explored what you can eat while in the back country. Dont think if a bird or other animal can eat it a human can. It isn't always that simple. Some plants can only be harvested during certain times of the year or they are not ok to eat. Sort of like the Chris Macandles or what ever his name was in the book "into the wild" learned about wild potatoes. For that matter any potatoes that are still on the plant and in sun light have a green color to them. They are no good to eat. the green part will make you sick or worse. Little things like that can be key to know what and when to eat something growing in the wilds. Be careful.
    Last edited by tom.keyes; July 17th, 2009 at 01:24 PM.
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  29. #29
    School Zones Optional osirus82's Avatar
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    i remember reading in a army survival manual, that if your unsure of what you can eat that you should start out eating very little portions then wait 30 mintues to see if it effects you, and so on, but i dont think its a good advice to slowly poison yourself either. just weird advice.

  30. #30
    The yellowish ones in Colorado are the death cap.
    I think the yellow ones in my pic are the same as the red. They seem to turn yellow as they age/dry out. Personally, the only mushrooms I'll eat are from the grocery store or restaurant LOL.

    I took those pics on saints john trail a few years ago after a very wet spring. I'd never noticed those particular mushrooms before. I have since seen them on a few other trails.

  31. #31
    I ain't eatin' nothin' that didn't come from a grocery store.
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  32. #32
    ni0h's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom.keyes View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

    The yellowish ones in Colorado are the death cap. The red ones are ok. You just have to make sure they dont have the ring around the stem. Amanita Mascara is what they are called and there is a ton of writing on this mushroom through out history.
    Who are you trying to kill?

    Yes, that's Amanita Muscaria.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria
    Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly Amanita, is a poisonous and psychoactive basidiomycete fungus,
    Yes, there are edible species of Amanita, some that even resemble Muscaria. But they are so similar that even experts can't tell them apart. Further, they often grow in the same places, so that one person can eat one and be OK, pronounce them safe, and everyone dies. Some of them have very slow-acting poison, so that the inexorable process of dying starts a week or so after ingestion. Actual amanita muscaria isn't strongly poisonous - you'd have to eat a pretty big helping for fatality. The hallucinogenic part is troublesome, though.
    edit: I just read a little more...
    In eastern Siberia, the shaman would consume the mushrooms, and others would drink his urine. This urine, still containing active hallucinogens may actually be more potent than the A. muscaria mushrooms with fewer negative effects, such as sweating and twitching, suggesting that the initial user may act as a screening filter for other components in the mushroom.
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    Last edited by ni0h; July 17th, 2009 at 04:50 PM.

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