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Camp
October 25th, 2010, 01:44 PM
Ok, school me on beacons. I've got a credit at REI and I need to pick one up. My wife has a Tracker DTS but, with all the new technology, I'm thinking about getting something a little more high end like something from Mammut Barryvox or Pieps DPS.

So, what do you guys have and what kind of feedback can you provide for info? I'm looking at doing a good bit of backcountry this year so, I need to get the right gear and get to a class.

meatblanket
October 25th, 2010, 02:07 PM
I'm not sure what "high end" gets you in an avy beacon, but the BCA Tracker is what I carry and what most of my friends carry. I'm confident that it will work properly if needed.

Most important is familiarity with the equipment. Practice is good. So if you already have some familiarity with the BCA Tracker, I'd stick with it. And if one of my friends needs to borrow it, they'll know how to use it.

Camp
October 25th, 2010, 04:41 PM
High End gets you a better range and the ability to deal with multiple burials. The Tracker DTS is not so good at multiple burials and its range is pretty pathetic when compared to some of the others I listed but, that is also why it is MUCH cheaper. You also get multiple antenna's on the higher end units, which increases its ability to be accurate.

meatblanket
October 25th, 2010, 04:51 PM
Lou Dawson does a great job on his gear reviews, I'd take a look there and see if he has reviewed any of the models you are considering.

www.wildsnow.com (http://www.wildsnow.com)

Camp
October 25th, 2010, 05:10 PM
Thanks, I was also reading here earlier:
http://beaconreviews.com/transceivers/

Camp
October 25th, 2010, 05:16 PM
Everything I find leads me to believe that the Pieps DPS is the best choice for what I plan to do. As the guy in REI put it, I'm not using the beacon to search for myself. I am using it to search for my wife or others and the cost of life is far more than the cost of a good beacon.

meatblanket
October 25th, 2010, 06:19 PM
Everything I find leads me to believe that the Pieps DPS is the best choice for what I plan to do. As the guy in REI put it, I'm not using the beacon to search for myself. I am using it to search for my wife or others and the cost of life is far more than the cost of a good beacon.

True. If you really wanted to save cash, you could just go with the old "helium filled balloon tethered to your body" technique.:D

Camp
October 26th, 2010, 08:05 AM
True. If you really wanted to save cash, you could just go with the old "helium filled balloon tethered to your body" technique.:D

I haven't got enough life insurance on her yet and won't be able to until I re-up my benefits during open enrollment, which is January so, I guess I better keep her safe between now and then :D

ArloGuthroJeep
October 26th, 2010, 03:32 PM
Everything I find leads me to believe that the Pieps DPS is the best choice for what I plan to do. As the guy in REI put it, I'm not using the beacon to search for myself. I am using it to search for my wife or others and the cost of life is far more than the cost of a good beacon.

Or buy a nice beacon and give it to whomever else you're skiing with;)

I have a BCA tracker - bought it due to price at the time. Am very happy with it. I forgot the exact number, but multiple burials are very rare IIRC.

scottycards
October 31st, 2010, 03:03 PM
I forgot the exact number, but multiple burials are very rare IIRC.

:thumbsup:

One at a time down sketchy terrain, other skiers in safe areas spotting.

Camp
November 1st, 2010, 02:35 PM
:thumbsup:

One at a time down sketchy terrain, other skiers in safe areas spotting.

That is good thinking for skiing but, I'm also planning a bunch of hut trips this winter on snow shoes and/or tele skis. Depending on where you are, the whole group could get swept up even if you are being careful, pending the slide happens way above you. Obviously keep some distance between members when crossing a chute but, there is really only so much safety you can have, not everything is preventable.

By the way, did anyone see the article about the young guy that got caught in one already this year, on a snowboard, on Mt. Baldy? I was in Crested Butte over the weekend and it was in their local paper. Luckily him and his buddies survived. He was the only one swept up as he was below the group and he was able to swim in the slide, putting him on top at the stopping point. He got lucky and he knows it because none of them had any avy gear on them.

scottycards
November 4th, 2010, 04:23 PM
Yeah, most hut trips will require crossing some runout zones. Still, cross one at a time.

Oh, and use skis. The 3-5 hours up to the hut is a bitch no matter what, but coming down from a hut on snowshoes is the worst. Skiing down is super fun, and takes about a tenth the time.

If you really want to style it up when going to huts, ditch the backpack and tow a sled. That's the total ticket.

meatblanket
November 4th, 2010, 04:58 PM
If you really want to style it up when going to huts, ditch the backpack and tow a sled. That's the total ticket.

It's called a pulk, dammit!:flipoff2:

Sidehilling with one of those, particularly in the trees, sucks big time IMHO. And they want to run over you going downhill. I'm not a fan, but I'm sure somebody has a setup that works.

I'm totally with you on the skis though, just make sure it is AT gear so you can make a proper turn.:flipoff2:

Camp
November 5th, 2010, 07:15 AM
I'm torn on what to do with skies for the season. I have AT boots but, have normal alpine bindings on the skies I've used the last three years. I have an older set of skies with nothing on them right now and was considering putting AT bindings on them but, I am thinking Telemark is the way to go this season. Any thoughts or input? I've never tele'd but, after as many years of hockey and mountain biking I've done, I don't have a lot of fear that I can't pick it up fast and know my legs will survive it.

ArloGuthroJeep
November 5th, 2010, 08:24 AM
Are you looking to "waste" a season getting comfortable skiing tele? Obviously wouldn't be a waste, but you're going to be learning instead of 100% enjoying skiing. You can always ski tele's like regular skis if you keep your heel planted.

Do you have tele boots? If not that is another expense.

meatblanket
November 5th, 2010, 08:41 AM
Well, it used to be that tele was your only choice for BC skiing. There have been major improvements in both tele and AT equipment, so either works well. It's really just a matter of personal preference.

If your AT boots are Dynafit compatable, consider Dynafit bindings. They are super light and have a natural and unrestricted pivot point right at the toe. They are a bit more difficult to get in and out of than Fritschi, but well worth it imho. They will go uphill faster than snowshoes, and go downhill almost as well as your downhill gear.:thumbsup:

ArloGuthroJeep
November 5th, 2010, 08:46 AM
If you're into big jumps Dynafit may not be for you. On the flip side, they are easier to field repair than Fritschi.

meatblanket
November 5th, 2010, 08:59 AM
If you're into big jumps Dynafit may not be for you. On the flip side, they are easier to field repair than Fritschi.

True, it is possible for the ski to flex hard enough when landing a big jump for the pins in the heel to release. Or so I've been told. I've never experienced it myself.

I've skied Dynafits in bounds in moguls, and the biggest limiting factor for me is the soft flexiness of the AT boots I have.

Oh, one other thing. The Fritschi bindings often make an annoying "clack clack" sound when climbing. Dynafits don't do that.:D

Camp
November 5th, 2010, 09:13 AM
Great info. I have a set of tele skis but, no bindings or boots. I have AT boots and two pairs of skis, one with alpine bindings and one with nothing, pending I can find them in my storage unit anyway and I didn't toss them when I moved out of my house... It sounds like finding my hiding Volkl's and buying a good set of bindings is the cheaper route for this season, as well as enjoyable. I don't do a lot of jumping anymore, although I did in my younger years. From the sounds of things, the Dynafits would do well for me.

Now to start researching where to get my new stuff :D

:beer:

ArloGuthroJeep
November 5th, 2010, 11:34 AM
I am not sure where Perpetual Tuesday is exactly (:flipoff2: ) but if you're nearish Boulder, Neptune Mountaineering is the best place around here to get back country gear.

I have bought about half my gear there, and the other half on backcountry.com (when they have sales).

meatblanket
November 5th, 2010, 12:09 PM
The Bent Gate in Golden is a great source for AT gear and tele, nearby also is Alpenglow.

Having said that, the best deals are usually found on Craigslist and eBay.

Camp
November 9th, 2010, 09:48 AM
I'm plan to hit up Craigslist this week to see what I can find. I currently live in Broomfield but, have been to Bent Gate and often buy stuff from Backcountry.com. I am pretty sure I've been into Neptune and plan to go back as that is where my wife wanted me to look after I had exhausted Craigslist.

:beer: