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ZappBranigan
August 16th, 2010, 08:35 AM
Well, first off, thanks again to CO4x4 and Geoff (MikeRochip), I am now the proud owner of a 4x8 utility trailer.

Resto process started this weekend, and I'm looking for some input from those of you who've been down this road before.

First question: Wood flooring. What should I use, ordinary 2x10 planks or treated wood (like the kind you'd use for a deck?) Is there anything I should do, treatment-wise, to protect it (stain, varnish, waterproofing, ect?) Most likely will not be moving too many big items that are likely to scratch (may be used to haul motorcycles or small furniture items) it but it would be good to know what I can do to keep the boards from rotting out again.

Second question: Wheels: Am I right in understanding that trailers of this type (i.e. small utility trailers without brakes) generally have sealed bearings? Assuming that I'm not getting any undue sound or "scraping" from the wheels, does that mean my bearings are likely OK? Is there any way to check/inspect them? Do they need to be greased?

Third question: Painting the leaf springs: I'm going to be wire brushing to remove the rust and then I'll prime and then paint the trailer frame and axle. What about the springs? the whole thing has a light surface rust to it, but should I paint the springs? I understand springs flex, so I don't know if any paint would stay on, but I just feel like they should be painted or something should be put on them to stop the rust, particularly since the trailer will be stored outside.

Here is the trailer as it appeared when I got it a week ago Saturday:

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z256/ZappBranigan/New%20trailer/2010_0807_162840AA.jpg

And here she is after I removed the floorboards and most of the wires and lights yesterday:

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z256/ZappBranigan/New%20trailer/2010_0815_173538AA.jpg

Plans are to brush/buff the rust off the frame, then prime, then paint, then put the lights on, then put the floorboards on, and then I'll be registering/titling it as a homebuilt.

CSP
August 16th, 2010, 08:48 AM
Bearings are not sealed.

Use a pair or Channelocks to remove the silver dust cap on the end of the wheelbearing hubs and you'll see the retaining nut and cotter pin that have to be removed to get to the bearings.

My 2002 carhauler has treated 2x6's on the deck that are in very good shape still and it sits outside 24/7.

CLYDE
August 16th, 2010, 08:48 AM
Nope, not sealed bearings, repack em. Paint everything, it will take a long time for the flex to wear it off, I really like the self etching primer. Treated lumber is good if it will be outside all the time, and thompsons water seal does a good job of keeping it up..

JimhatTJ
August 16th, 2010, 08:53 AM
and be sure after re-packing the bearing you dont over tighten them and destroy the bearing in less than a mile.

yea that sucked.

mattpenhollow
August 16th, 2010, 01:44 PM
and be sure after re-packing the bearing you dont over tighten them and destroy the bearing in less than a mile.

yea that sucked.

x2 ive been down that road before. Look for some of the rustoleum farm implement paint. it lasts forever.

JimhatTJ
August 16th, 2010, 02:36 PM
x2 ive been down that road before. Look for some of the rustoleum farm implement paint. it lasts forever.

x2 i just repainted my gooseneck and thats some tuff paint

BumperMan
August 16th, 2010, 04:41 PM
I would just go buy some angle, and a piece of 4X8 tread plate. Weld some braces in and weld the metal floor down. If you don't do that, use treated wood. Down the road you can use used oil to treat it. Makes it a little slick for a bit, but works well.

On a side note. For $40 at Harbor freight, you can buy a wheel chalk for your bike that will make hauling it much eaiser, and more secure, It has a metal plate that boltes to the floor, then the chalk bolts to that. I ran mine to FL and back for the it's initial run, and loved it. Much better than my old system.


ETA: if you can get it, get you some small metal tubing and weld it down the frame to run your wires in. It will help keep them secure and out of the weather. I have also had good luck using those cheapy extension cords for the trailer wiring, they seem to last longer than standard trailer wires. 2 of them will do the trick nicely.


ETA again: Was that a tilting trailer at one time? I had one of those and hated it for my bike, if you were thinking of dumping the ramp don't.

JimhatTJ
August 16th, 2010, 04:47 PM
didnt even look that close, but now i do see a pin under the front of it that looks like it would fold.

Scooter
August 16th, 2010, 05:01 PM
Are the boards rotted? If not, power wash / sand them, then apply some Thompson water seal and screw them back on.
X2 on using an extension cord, but looks like you have the wiring already in the temp magnetic ones in your photo. Use that or go and buy a new set at harbor freight when you pick up the wheel chock.
A good little utility trailer is a great thing to have!:thumbsup:

ZappBranigan
August 16th, 2010, 05:32 PM
ETA again: Was that a tilting trailer at one time? I had one of those and hated it for my bike, if you were thinking of dumping the ramp don't.


didnt even look that close, but now i do see a pin under the front of it that looks like it would fold.

Yes it tilts. But no, I'm NOT getting rid of the ramp, the ramp is one of the reasons I want this kind of trailer.


Are the boards rotted?

You tell me:

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z256/ZappBranigan/New%20trailer/2010_0807_162855AA.jpg

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z256/ZappBranigan/New%20trailer/2010_0807_162849AA.jpg

:D

Seriously they were trash and are in the trash can. I'll go with new treated wood.

Thanks for all the tips! :thumbsup:

ZappBranigan
August 17th, 2010, 08:30 AM
Bearings are not sealed.

Use a pair or Channelocks to remove the silver dust cap on the end of the wheelbearing hubs and you'll see the retaining nut and cotter pin that have to be removed to get to the bearings.


Do they unscrew or do they just pop off?

JimhatTJ
August 17th, 2010, 08:32 AM
on little trailers they usually just pop off.

CSP
August 17th, 2010, 02:44 PM
Yep, just pop off. You can use a screwdriver blade or prybar to get between the lip on the cap and the wheelbearing hub to get them started.

CAC91
August 18th, 2010, 12:02 PM
As long as the leaf springs weren't originally installed on a toyota vehicle, I say you should be fine despite the surface rust. If they are toyota springs, replace them immediately! They've been known to explode if you look at them funny.