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_CJ
May 18th, 2009, 10:00 PM
I know this can be a hot topic, but what are everyone's opinions on revolvers vs pistols?

I have a friend (that has worked in several gun shops over the years and has a HUGE collection) telling me that a revolver is the better choice for general handgun use. Simple, dependable, cheap ammo, etc. BUT....I really liked another friend's Glock .40 cal when I shot it the other day......but the first friend called it a "kaboom gun" suggesting they tend to blow up in the shooter's face frequently.

First friend suggested a .357 magnum 66 like this.....
http://www.lipseys.com/eImages/2008-EXCLUSIVE-GP100.jpg

Mike Boyle
May 18th, 2009, 10:23 PM
It comes down to what you want and feel most comfortable shooting. DO NOT buy something you aren't 100% comfortable shooting just because a friend says its better. Buy what YOU like and know you will use. The only time any hand gun (revolver or semi auto) blows up in the shooters face is when someone has either improperly cared for the gun or they improperly reloaded a round. I own several hand guns and not a single one is a revolver (I just don't like them). I've probably shot over 3000 rounds combined in the last year and have had zero issues (other than some cheap .22 ammo not feeding or firing) with any of my weapons.

MonkeyBomb
May 18th, 2009, 10:59 PM
Generally speaking a good revolver with good ammo will go bang when you pull the trigger. I prefer a pistol though. I have never had a problem with any of the pistols I carrry on a regular basis.

I can also say without a doubt I have recieved far more injuries on the range standing near someone with a revolver. If I can I distance myself from them to avoid schrapnel. For some reason I tend to always get hit if someone is shaving round because of bad timing. I got a nasty cut from someone shooting a 460 the other day.

I instruct and end up in close proximity to those on the line. I have only seen one pistol "blow up" and it just split the grips and shot the magazine out the bottom. No damage to anything or anyone but the pistol.

I have seen a ton of revolvers old and new that like to shave rounds though.

Loki
May 18th, 2009, 11:06 PM
Revolvers are a great gun to learn to shoot on. Learn to shoot them accurately in Double Action, and you'll be ahead of the game when it comes to shooting a pistol. I learned on my dad Security Six, first with 38 special loads then moved up the 357 mags.

The model 66 is known to have some problems standing up to a heavy diet of magnum loads, and the 686 is a better choice for a S&W Revolver, check into the Ruger GP100 or SP101 as well.

And Glocks aren't going to go Boom if you keep them maintained, mine has about 8000 rounds thru it and its never done anything but keep firing.

Sounds like your buddy is trying to pass along his personal bias to you. :shrug:

CapnCrunch
May 18th, 2009, 11:21 PM
Echoing same. Buy what suits you and don't let someone else's judgements influence what works for you.

I mostly carry my .40 auto but sometimes I carry my .357 revolver when I want more punch available. They are both fine weapons and I gladly rely on either one of them.

_CJ
May 19th, 2009, 08:10 AM
How about some pros and cons of each? Or suggestions for something reasonably priced, dependable, mid-caliber, not to big/heavy?

I've been told to avoid Taurus pistols, but how about the revolvers?

Loki
May 19th, 2009, 09:07 AM
Haha Just looked closer at the Pic, that is a Ruger. :laughing:

ZappBranigan
May 19th, 2009, 10:00 AM
but the first friend called it a "kaboom gun" suggesting they tend to blow up in the shooter's face frequently.

First friend suggested a .357 magnum 66 like this.....
http://www.lipseys.com/eImages/2008-EXCLUSIVE-GP100.jpg

Well, that's a Ruger not a "magnum 66" (whatever the hell that is.) I assume your friend meant a Smith and Wesson Model 66 (though I think Taurus also makes a gun called the Model 66.)

And I would say that your "first friend" doesn't know shat about guns if he can't tell a Smith from a Ruger and if he thinks a Glock will "blow up." :rolleyes:

So my first piece of advice would be: Ignore everything your "first friend" told you. :D

_CJ
May 19th, 2009, 10:51 AM
It's me that doesn't know shat. I just googled .357 magnum 66 and came across that picture. I think he did say S&W model 66.

As for Glocks blowing up, take a look at these, or just google "glock kaboom".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTGpeURxxQs

http://www.thegunzone.com/glock/glock-kb-faq.html

http://www.pishtov.com/Glock/glock_kaboom_photo.jpg

http://www.leverguns.com/articles/taylor/blowup_images/glock4.jpg



Anyhow......back to the original question. What do you like and why do you like it?

Barf Bag
May 19th, 2009, 11:45 AM
Anyhow......back to the original question. What do you like and why do you like it?

I like them all. but right now I prefer my XD for carrying and for USPSA comps. for light hearted plinking, it is hard for me to leave the house without my ruger MKIIII, that thing is fun and cheap to shoot. another favorite of mine is my S&W model 28, it is old and heavy, but smooth as silk.

about those glock pics, I would assume that was neglect and/or an operator/ammunition induced failure.

I personally dont like the way a glock 'fits' my hand, but I couldnt badmouth one and would never try and talk someone out of getting one. I am actually thinking about getting one for my wife.

ZappBranigan
May 19th, 2009, 12:53 PM
The big question is: What will the gun be for? Concealed carry favors either a small to medium semi auto or a small revolver. For non-concealed carry there's no reason to prefer one over the other - it's sort of like the automatic transmission vs. manual transmission issue. Personal preference is the deciding factor. :shrug:

If you want to shoot really big, powerful bullets, then the revolver is the only way to go: .44 mag up to the .454 Casull, .460, .500 and all the other 'super' cartridges are designed to be fired in big, heavy revolvers.

Automatics have been in favor for the last 20 years or so, many people like them because they're sexy and cool and you can carry 15 or 20 rounds.

Wheelguns are more of an acquired taste. Those of us who are old enough to remember when most cops carried revolvers are probably more comfortable with them as self-defense arms.

Either one will do fine for self defense, although IMO it's more difficult to learn how to shoot an automatic because the mechanism itself is a bit more complicated. The revolver is more of a simple "point-and-shoot" design.

_CJ
May 19th, 2009, 01:50 PM
it's sort of like the automatic transmission vs. manual transmission issue. :shrug:

Now you're speaking my language. :thumbsup:

Intended use would be to keep around the house/shop, in the car while traveling, take with me while hiking, easy to use and not too intimidating for the wife to use. Ammo that is generally available and affordable would be nice too. Part of the reason I like the .40 cal.

On our recent trip, the wife took to calling my shotgun the "elephant gun". It's doubtful that she'll ever be comfortable with it, so having something smaller, lighter, and easily transported would be best.

Initially, the Taurus PT 145 (.45 acp) caught my eye but they don't seem to have such a great rep. Then I shot my friend's Glock 23? (.40 cal) and really liked it, but another friend suggested the model 66 and told me about the kaboom thing.

Ultimately I think both my wife and I will have CC permits as her employer has offered to pay for the course, so I guess I'm leaning heavily towards a high power/small package semi-auto.

EDIT: Any opinions on the Bersa Thunder 380?
http://www.galleryofguns.com/Genie/Default.aspx?item=THUN380MLTCC&mfg=Bersa&mdl=All&cat=1&type=Semi-Automatic+Pistol&cal=All&fin=All&sit=Fixed

ToyRunner1
May 19th, 2009, 02:15 PM
Take a look at the XD40 for both of you. When I took my CC class last year the NRA instructor stated it was the best on the market for it's price range. I had already purchased my XD45, so it just made me feel better about my choice. I carry it most often, but I also love my Taurus 606, although it is an older revolver from when Taurus had a better reputation. The XD(M) series is very nice as well. They make a very nice 9mm in either model in case your wife feels the 40 is too large.

ZappBranigan
May 19th, 2009, 02:35 PM
Can your wife comfortably and reliably rack the slide of an automatic? Does she know how to clear a jam? Does she know how the safety works (if it has one?)

My wife hates automatic pistols and doesn't do well with them. They do require more knowledge and skill to use. Also some novice shooters are distracted by the movement of an automatic. Hold an autopistol wrong and it will "bite" you, hard.

A revolver, otoh, is pretty much foolproof. Not only that but IMO a revolver is safer because you can tell whether a revolver is loaded or not with a glance. Biggest safety issue with revolvers is, as monkeybomb stated above, 'shaving' rounds off due to the timing not being exactly on.

Something to consider.

Yes, automatics carry more rounds, but most gunfights involve about 3 shots so for defense purposes, that shouldn't be a huge factor.

Barf Bag
May 19th, 2009, 02:53 PM
Can your wife comfortably and reliably rack the slide of an automatic? Does she know how to clear a jam? Does she know how the safety works (if it has one?)

proper practice will overcome any lacking in those areas. I would stress that whatever gun you chose, practice, practice, practice. any gun in untrained hands will be problematic in the best of situations, throw stress and fear in there and things will only get worse

dahoyle
May 19th, 2009, 03:28 PM
Well, this is just a personal opinion, but I am a big fan of the 1911. Of course, I have many years of familiarity with them, and in truth, to be safe with one, you had best spend some time with it. Single action pistols are really best suited for actual combat conditions, and not so good for street carry, but that isn't to say that with the proper training and practice, they would be bad.

For street carry, the more modern Colt 1911's have the firing pin stop or what ever it is called, to keep an impact to the hammer from firing the pistol, so you can carry them with a chambered round, with the hammer down. I wouldn't do it on any of the other 1911's. Would have to have an empty chamber under the hammer on those, and then you have to remember to rack the slide.

A good DA/SA pistol is hard to beat if you have to get a shot off in a hurry, because you don't have to cock them or rack the slide, but you will have a long pull. The remainder of the shots will all be SA, so much less pull, and lighter trigger.

A DA revolver is a very good choice for street carry, but they take much more practice to shoot accurately. There is a long, relatively stiff hammer pull, and you have to make sure it is pointed where you want it when the hammer falls. That takes a lot of practice.

Really no reason to consider a SA revolver for anything besides sport, and a DA only pistol just makes no sense at all to me.

Oh, and I used the word pistol in this post to refer to a semi-automatic pistol, as described by Webster, but in this day and age, a pistol generally refers to a handgun of any variety. A good example of a handgun that is a pistol, but is not a semi-auto, would be a Thompson Contender. The chamber is part of the barrel on it, so by the purest definition, it is a pistol, as are muzzle loaders.

IH8PVMNT
May 19th, 2009, 05:38 PM
Well, this is just a personal opinion, but I am a big fan of the 1911. Of course, I have many years of familiarity with them, and in truth, to be safe with one, you had best spend some time with it. Single action pistols are really best suited for actual combat conditions, and not so good for street carry, but that isn't to say that with the proper training and practice, they would be bad.

For street carry, the more modern Colt 1911's have the firing pin stop or what ever it is called, to keep an impact to the hammer from firing the pistol, so you can carry them with a chambered round, with the hammer down. I wouldn't do it on any of the other 1911's. Would have to have an empty chamber under the hammer on those, and then you have to remember to rack the slide.

A good DA/SA pistol is hard to beat if you have to get a shot off in a hurry, because you don't have to cock them or rack the slide, but you will have a long pull. The remainder of the shots will all be SA, so much less pull, and lighter trigger.

A DA revolver is a very good choice for street carry, but they take much more practice to shoot accurately. There is a long, relatively stiff hammer pull, and you have to make sure it is pointed where you want it when the hammer falls. That takes a lot of practice.

Really no reason to consider a SA revolver for anything besides sport, and a DA only pistol just makes no sense at all to me.

Oh, and I used the word pistol in this post to refer to a semi-automatic pistol, as described by Webster, but in this day and age, a pistol generally refers to a handgun of any variety. A good example of a handgun that is a pistol, but is not a semi-auto, would be a Thompson Contender. The chamber is part of the barrel on it, so by the purest definition, it is a pistol, as are muzzle loaders.

Interesting opinion but I would disagree which is the great thing about this thread :) I actually prefer SA pistols for carry. My personal opinion is DA is less accurate due to the longer and heavier trigger pull so for a DA/SA pistol that first shot which is likely the most critical one will be less accurate than successive shots. Now you can certainly train that out but I think its far easier to learn and be accurate with a weapon that does not change trigger pull after the first shot but is consistent all the time. Plus if you ever actually have to use a weapon (something I would never wish on anyone) the blood is pumping and finess training unless its REALLY ingrained can go out the window so either the first shot will be on and successive shots will be jerky or more likely the first shot will be low and left and the successive shots will be on as muscle memory takes over. As for the carrying a round chambered or not with a SA only pistol the typical carry stage is round chambered, hammer back, safety on. My glock which is SA (striker fire if you wish) I carry round chambered. Glocks don't have an external hammer like a 1911 but essentially there is no difference IMHO.

MonkeyBomb
May 19th, 2009, 05:45 PM
For a novice I highly recommend a revolver. I recommend alot of practice either way.

newracer
May 19th, 2009, 05:51 PM
Get both. :thumbsup:

970TJ
May 19th, 2009, 06:08 PM
IMO I am big fan of 1911. I have two, one 5 inch fullsize and a 2 inch micro compact. I carry the 5 inch in the winter(more clothes to conceal) and the compact in the summer. I do however carry them with an empty chamber but I have done some serious practicing drawing and racking the slide at the same time. I also have a Baby Eagle in .45 that I carry often and it is a SA/DA pistol with a decock. I do carry the Baby Eagle with a round chambered and the hammer down with no worries. All these pistols have one thing in common: They are all 100% METAL. Something about plastic pistols turns me off-I like the feel and look of wood and metal, I guess i'm old fashioned. Not saying anything bad about polymer pistols this is just my .02. But one thing about a revolver, it will ALWAYS go boom when you pul the trigger. My old man won't carry anything but.
:beer:

Cranky CJ
May 19th, 2009, 11:19 PM
Get both. :thumbsup:

what he said.....just go get one, shoot it. then get a different one and shoot it. then you'll have both and can shoot either whenever you want....the best of both worlds.....

ZappBranigan
May 20th, 2009, 08:16 AM
My glock which is SA (striker fire if you wish) I carry round chambered. Glocks don't have an external hammer like a 1911 but essentially there is no difference IMHO.

I'm pretty sure the striker is not fully cocked on a Glock until you pull the trigger. IOW a Glock is more like a DA-only pistol because every time you pull the trigger you have to cock the striker.

_CJ
May 20th, 2009, 01:54 PM
More guns! That's the answer. :D

I'm definitely starting to see that the two styles aren't really interchangable. Need a small and slim semi-auto for CC, but a large caliber revolver would be cool to have in the car, around the house, or in the backcountry.

Kind of liking the looks of the Taurus Raging Bull guns. Didn't somebody here buy one recently?

IH8PVMNT
May 20th, 2009, 02:44 PM
I'm pretty sure the striker is not fully cocked on a Glock until you pull the trigger. IOW a Glock is more like a DA-only pistol because every time you pull the trigger you have to cock the striker.

Yes and No:

While a Glock is not strictly a SA type firearm its not a DA either I believe the term is Pre-Set trigger. On a Glock, the slide must first be racked to partially compress the striker (or firing pin) spring and set the trigger before the pistol can be fired, very much like a single action except the firing pin is only partially compressed. After the slide has been racked and the trigger set, the standard Glock trigger pull feels somewhat like a two-stage, single action military trigger. Again I really enjoy two-stage triggers, matter of opinion. The "safe action" fire control system is a single-action mechanism utilizing a striker instead of a hammer and firing pin. Like most other striker-fired pistols, a Glock pistol requires the trigger to pull the striker back the rest of the way, and to release it, unlike a DA which the hammer starts at the decocked position. In its ready-to-fire state, the pistol could be considered to be "half-cocked". This translates to consistent trigger pulls which I think makes training easier more like a SA or DA only weapon, the glock is a lot lighter trigger pull than a DA only firearm but indeed heavier than a SA firearm. Glock is the best of both worlds IMHO with respect to the safety of a DA and the consistent easy trigger pull like a SA.

ZappBranigan
May 20th, 2009, 02:49 PM
More guns! That's the answer. :D

I'm definitely starting to see that the two styles aren't really interchangable. Need a small and slim semi-auto for CC, but a large caliber revolver would be cool to have in the car, around the house, or in the backcountry.

Kind of liking the looks of the Taurus Raging Bull guns. Didn't somebody here buy one recently?

Hmmm...I don't own a Raging Bull, but I own an older Taurus .22 DA revolver. It's okay but nothing special. I only got it because a .22 S&W DA revolver would have been $400+ and I'm not going to spend that kind of money on a .22.

For a centerfire revolver, I would stick with one of the Big 3: Smith & Wesson, Colt or Ruger.

Ruger is probably the best deal around. You should be able to find an older Speed Six or Security Six (Speed Six = fixed sights, Security Six = adjustable sights) for maybe $300 (however I haven't shopped recently so who knows what the prices are now.) A used GP100 or SP101 should be just a little more.

Colt and S&W revolvers are a little nicer (better finished, IMO, and not as heavy) but cost quite a bit more (particularly the Python which, IMO, is one of the most overrated guns ever made.)

Dan Wesson is another possibility, and DW revolvers do have the interchangeable barrels which is kind of cool. But I owned a DW .357 revolver for a few years and wasn't all that impressed with it. :shrug:

Never owned, fired or even handled a Charter Arms so I can't comment on those.

As for Taurus, they are a company that used to make S&Ws under license in Brazil. Their revolvers are not bad but IMO still not up to S&W quality.

RG and Rossi are the bottom feeders of the revolver world. They are OK if you need a scary-looking paperweight but I wouldn't trust my life to one.

Loki
May 20th, 2009, 03:38 PM
I have a Taurus Raging Bull in 480 Ruger. It does everything my S&W and Ruger Revolvers do, and just as well.

YMMV

Pilot
May 21st, 2009, 08:05 AM
The others are correct. It depends what you are going to do with it. Both will serve you well. I have many more semi-auto handguns than revolvers. I use semi-autos for both home defense and CCW. My revolvers are single action, larger bore for hunting, woods carry or just fun shooting. Its hard to beat the versatility of revolvers like a Ruger GP 100 in .357 magnum as you can use .38 Spl. in it for practice or as a lower noise/blast home defense gun.

I have many pistols, but if you are going to buy one gun the above is hard to beat. However, why limit yourself? :beer:

BumperMan
May 22nd, 2009, 09:56 PM
Can your wife comfortably and reliably rack the slide of an automatic? Does she know how to clear a jam? Does she know how the safety works (if it has one?)

My wife hates automatic pistols and doesn't do well with them. They do require more knowledge and skill to use. Also some novice shooters are distracted by the movement of an automatic. Hold an autopistol wrong and it will "bite" you, hard.

A revolver, otoh, is pretty much foolproof. Not only that but IMO a revolver is safer because you can tell whether a revolver is loaded or not with a glance. Biggest safety issue with revolvers is, as monkeybomb stated above, 'shaving' rounds off due to the timing not being exactly on.

Something to consider.

Yes, automatics carry more rounds, but most gunfights involve about 3 shots so for defense purposes, that shouldn't be a huge factor.

Agreed. Revolvers are simple and reliable for a beginner.


Hmmm...I don't own a Raging Bull, but I own an older Taurus .22 DA revolver. It's okay but nothing special. I only got it because a .22 S&W DA revolver would have been $400+ and I'm not going to spend that kind of money on a .22.

For a centerfire revolver, I would stick with one of the Big 3: Smith & Wesson, Colt or Ruger.

Ruger is probably the best deal around. You should be able to find an older Speed Six or Security Six (Speed Six = fixed sights, Security Six = adjustable sights) for maybe $300 (however I haven't shopped recently so who knows what the prices are now.) A used GP100 or SP101 should be just a little more.

Colt and S&W revolvers are a little nicer (better finished, IMO, and not as heavy) but cost quite a bit more (particularly the Python which, IMO, is one of the most overrated guns ever made.)

Dan Wesson is another possibility, and DW revolvers do have the interchangeable barrels which is kind of cool. But I owned a DW .357 revolver for a few years and wasn't all that impressed with it. :shrug:

Never owned, fired or even handled a Charter Arms so I can't comment on those.

As for Taurus, they are a company that used to make S&Ws under license in Brazil. Their revolvers are not bad but IMO still not up to S&W quality.

RG and Rossi are the bottom feeders of the revolver world. They are OK if you need a scary-looking paperweight but I wouldn't trust my life to one.

You guys and your brand loyalty and snobbery. I have the Taurus in 40 and 45 I have shot lots and lots of rounds through each one with no problems. I also have 3 of the most hated weapons in the world hi-points. They are fine weapons and will kill you as dead as your fancy name brand weapons.


Now let's talk Caliber for a minute. I highly recommend that you stay away from 40s. I have a couple of .40s. I HATE THEM. I have .45s in the same weapon, and that makes it all the worse. I bought my wife a 40 in a weapon that I already had in 45 (that she had shot). She hated it and wanted to keep my 45.

Hippie
May 22nd, 2009, 10:22 PM
Agreed. Revolvers are simple and reliable for a beginner.



You guys and your brand loyalty and snobbery.:hail::hail::hail::hail:


Now let's talk Caliber for a minute. I highly recommend that you stay away from 40s. I have a couple of .40s. I HATE THEM. I have .45s in the same weapon, and that makes it all the worse. I bought my wife a 40 in a weapon that I already had in 45 (that she had shot). She hated it and wanted to keep my 45.

I like my .357 :D:flipoff2:

rondog
May 23rd, 2009, 12:20 AM
I've owned two S&W Model 19 6" Combat Magnums in .357 in the past. God, I wish I had 'em back! Those were some sweet-shootin' guns. Great triggers, great sights and deadly accurate. Only wheeler I have now is a S&W Model 49 pocket snubbie in .38 Special, can't hit squat with it, but it's not a target gun either. Wheelguns are great, overall! I'd like to have more. Currently I have a handful of autos though, and those rock quite well.

dahoyle
May 23rd, 2009, 12:19 PM
Interesting opinion but I would disagree which is the great thing about this thread :) I actually prefer SA pistols for carry. My personal opinion is DA is less accurate due to the longer and heavier trigger pull so for a DA/SA pistol that first shot which is likely the most critical one will be less accurate than successive shots.


I prefer the SA only as well, so we agree to a point. I just hesitate to recommend one to someone else. The advantages of the SA you listed are certainly true, as are the disadvantages of a DA/SA. When the Army went to the Beretta, it was a disappointment, and ultimately those of us who were used to the 1911 preferred it, but it was more of a question of ballistics than the DA side of things. That said, after a little practice, qualification scores weren't that different. Yes, the first shot is more difficult, and it is as you said, the most important, but it is better to miss with that one, than it is to shoot yourself. Training, and only training, will help to eliminate both issues, but not many people have the opportunity to spend the amount of time that we did at the range.

DanaT
May 23rd, 2009, 04:51 PM
There are advantages and disadvantages to both.
In general, you will find revolvers tend to be chambered for more powerful loads and have better accuracy. The improved accuracy is due to the fixed barrel. The rap for revolvers being more reliable is somewhat true and somewhat false. If you get a round that wont fire due most likely to a defective primer, pull the trigger again and the next round is ready. However, sometimes revolvers can jam due to bullet length and that prevents the cylinder from rotating. No more firing and in a panic situation almost impossible to fix. This is a very unlikely event with factory ammo. Revolvers only hold 5-8 rounds of ammo.

Semi-autos are used by the majority of police and military. If they thought there was a “tactical” or reliability disadvantage then the switch to semi autos would not have occurred. The semis have higher round counts, faster reloads, but are generally less accurate (non fixed barrels in most) and generally lower power cartridges.

The OP mentioned needing a house/car/woods/carry/mall ninja gun. In that case I strongly suggest a Desert Eagle in 50AE. :)

Now to add some seriousness to that if you really want something that has a chance against bigger critters than two legged ones then you want to narrow your search and need it for CCW and home defense I would limit your choices to the following:
DA 357Mag Revolver
DA 44Mag Revolver
I like Ruger and Colt Revolvers.
Glock 29 (and load it up with Double Tap Ammo). Also buy an SF version.

My pick would be the Glock 29. Personally, I like having more rounds. Why? Police shootings show that only about 1/3 of shots fired hit the target in a stress situation. That means the more rounds the more likely a hit is that will stop and imminently dangerous foe. The G29 is a medium sized pistol (although billed as subcompact it is really about the size a compact 9mm/40 pistol.

I see XDs recommended all the time. They are not bad a gun and a very nice feeling pistol. They are just very heavy and some have poor finishes that don’t stand up well even to the mild Colorado environment. I have heard that the finish problem has been addressed somewhat. I just like Glock a lot better than an XD. For all the XD purists, I will trade an XD straight across for a Glock. See putting my money where my mouth is. The ONE advantage over glock that the XD just recently had come out is that the XD Sub 9mm now has flush 13 round mags whereas a Glock 26 only has flush 10 rounders.

-Dana

Big Kev
May 24th, 2009, 05:58 AM
Agreed. Revolvers are simple and reliable for a beginner.



You guys and your brand loyalty and snobbery. I have the Taurus in 40 and 45 I have shot lots and lots of rounds through each one with no problems. I also have 3 of the most hated weapons in the world hi-points. They are fine weapons and will kill you as dead as your fancy name brand weapons.


Now let's talk Caliber for a minute. I highly recommend that you stay away from 40s. I have a couple of .40s. I HATE THEM. I have .45s in the same weapon, and that makes it all the worse. I bought my wife a 40 in a weapon that I already had in 45 (that she had shot). She hated it and wanted to keep my 45.

Wow. Revolvers vs. Semi-Autos. Now we bring up caliber. :popcorn:

I have a 40 and love it, but that is what I learned with so that is where I am comfortable. I have shot 9 and 45 also and they are good too. I think the 40 has more of a snap compared to the recoil of the 9 or 45. Some people hate it, it does not bother me at all. Its all personal preference. Shoot lots of things. Revolvers in as many calibers as you can get your hands on, same for the autos. Get what is comfortable to you and what you feel comfortable and confidant shooting.




(no offense to Budman, I was only making a point. I am sure your 45s are very nice. Please don't shoot me in the face.) :beer:

unclebill
May 24th, 2009, 06:44 AM
i likes em both.
but when the chips are down i'll grab a wheelgun.
i like big calibers.
http://i98.photobucket.com/albums/l272/billhedges/zsmithwesson27-2014-4.jpg
2 .357 mags
2 .45 l.c.'s
1 .44mag
1 .454 casull
1 .45acp

CapnCrunch
May 24th, 2009, 11:30 AM
Now let's talk Caliber for a minute. I highly recommend that you stay away from 40s. I have a couple of .40s. I HATE THEM. I have .45s in the same weapon, and that makes it all the worse. I bought my wife a 40 in a weapon that I already had in 45 (that she had shot). She hated it and wanted to keep my 45.


Wow. Revolvers vs. Semi-Autos. Now we bring up caliber. :popcorn:

I have a 40 and love it, but that is what I learned with so that is where I am comfortable. I have shot 9 and 45 also and they are good too. I think the 40 has more of a snap compared to the recoil of the 9 or 45. Some people hate it, it does not bother me at all. Its all personal preference. Shoot lots of things. Revolvers in as many calibers as you can get your hands on, same for the autos. Get what is comfortable to you and what you feel comfortable and confidant shooting.

Same here. I've had my .40 for 17 years and I love the thing. It's not the caliber I started with...I've shot a reasonable range of pistol calibers many times before and since (.22, .38 SP, .357 Mag, 9, .44 Mag, .45 ACP). Yes, it is a little snappy, but it doesn't bother me and I find it easy to control. Sometimes I carry something else, but my .40 is my most frequent concealed-carry weapon.

BumperMan
May 25th, 2009, 08:09 PM
(no offense to Budman, I was only making a point. I am sure your 45s are very nice. Please don't shoot me in the face.) :beer:

It is pretty hard to offend me on such a personal thing like weapon choice. ask 12 people this question and you will get 13 answers.


Same here. I've had my .40 for 17 years and I love the thing. It's not the caliber I started with...I've shot a reasonable range of pistol calibers many times before and since (.22, .38 SP, .357 Mag, 9, .44 Mag, .45 ACP). Yes, it is a little snappy, but it doesn't bother me and I find it easy to control. Sometimes I carry something else, but my .40 is my most frequent concealed-carry weapon.

I carried my 40 every day until I found the same weapon in a 45. I will carry that until I can afford a Pro carry.

Whitey
May 25th, 2009, 10:18 PM
I can name a few dozen guns that are my favorite. One is my pro-carry, another is my .44 mag S&W Trail Boss, or all the para's, esp my LDA's or .............

Ah heck, just go get one, any one, then get another and so on, it's like 4x4ing, a work in progress.